Julian's Science Experiments
  • Famous Experiments and Inventions
  • The Scientific Method
  • Home Physics Experiments Physics Science Fair Projects Physics Videos Physics Jokes Warning!
       

    Heat Absorption
    Primary School Experiments
    For Science Labs, Lesson Plans, Class Activities & Science Fair Projects







    This experiment is courtesy of 

    Taking In The Heat

    Amount of Heat Absorbed


    Developers:

    Ms. Joan Daly
    Stony Creek Elementary
    Wissahickon School District

    Charles E. Jones, Ph.D.
    Formulation Chemicals
    Rohm and Haas Company


    Grade
    Levels:

    1 st (Adaptable K through 3)


    Disciplines:

    Weather, Temperature, Heat Absorption with different materials


    Goal:

    Students will learn through the scientific process that different textured materials can absorb more heat than others.


    Objectives:

    1. Students will understand how a thermometer can be used to measure the amount of heat absorbed into cotton, nylon, fake fur and terry.
    2. Students will begin to discover the concepts of time (hour), the position of clock numbers, the movement of clock hands for each hour.
    3. Students will learn that graphs can be used to show pictures of heat differences.
    4. Students will learn that some materials absorb more heat than others.
    5. Students can utilize verbal and written means to report results.


    Background:

    The sun gives us heat and light. Heat can change the form of some things. Most matter expands when it is heated and contracts when it is cooled. Liquids expand when heated and contract when cooled. Air temperature is the amount of heat in the air. It can be measured with a thermometer. The warm air spreads to warm the substance inside the thermometer. The substance expands as it is heated. (Teacher hint: Large group and small group discussions, observations and experiences about different materials the children use in different seasons can enrich children's experiences. Let the children model different fabrics used inside and outside in different seasons. Good show and tell activity.)


    Vocabulary:

    thermometer

    temperature

    materials


    Literature:

    Gibbons, Gail

    Maestro, Betsy

     

    Weather Words and What They Mean

    Temperature and You

    Through the Year With Harriet

    Mollel, Telowa M.

    Rodgers, Paul

    Tresselt, Alvin K.

    A Promise to the Sun

    What Will the Weather Be Like Today?

    Sun Up


    Materials:

    1. Five thermometers.
    2. Early childhood hint: With young children it is best to use Enviro-SafeR Thermometers (non mercury).
    3. Four pieces of material sewed into rectangular sacks with one side open. The four pieces of material should be cotton, nylon, fake fur and terry, all white or the same color.
    4. Premade graphing sheets.
    5. A sunny area in a classroom.
    6. Strips of colored oak tag (1/4" x 6") - red, yellow, purple, green and black.
    7. Early childhood hint: Since children are just learning to read thermometers, mount each thermometer on a strip of oak tag 1" x 10" long. (Make sure all oak tag is the same color.)
    8. Timer and model clocks.


    Procedure:

    1. Lay out the four different material sacks so that each one gets the same amount of sun.
    2. Insert a thermometer in each sack.
    3. Place the edge of the opening at the 0 o C mark of the thermometer.
    4. Let them sit for one hour in the sun. (Use model clock to show start/finish).
    5. Remove thermometers and read temperature.
    6. Early childhood hint: Since children are learning to read thermometers, measure temperature by drawing a line next to the top of the green mercury.
    7. Place the reading on your graph making sure the 0 o C is on the 0 o C line.
    8. Compare/Contrast.
    9. Write which material absorbs the most heat or write whatever the graph tells them.


    Management (for early childhood):

    1. Teacher demonstrates the experiment to the whole class first.

    2. Then small mixed ability groups (4) will work at learning centers.

    3. Before sending groups to learning centers, teacher can summarize experiment by "reading" the directions at the learning center.


    Learning Center Directions:

    First

    1

    LOOK at the Thermometers

    Second

    2

    Wait 1 hour

    Fix clock

    Third

    3

    Paste the Oak tag

    cotton nylon fake fur terry  nothing

    Fourth

    4

    Color up to the line

    cotton -red

    nylon -yellow

    fake fur-purple

    terry -green

    control -black

    Fifth

    5

    Put in order

    1 warmest

    2

    3

    4

    5 coolest

    Sixth

    6

    Write

    Early Childhood Hint: Keep vocabulary words displayed so children can incorporate them into their writing.

    red

    yellow

    purple

    green

    black

    absorbs

    heat

    most

    least

    more

    less

    than

    terry

    cotton

    nylon

    fake fur

    control


    Questions:

    1. Which material absorbs the most heat?
    2. Which material absorbs the least amount of heat?
    3. Can you predict which material will keep ice from melting?
    4. Which material do you think will keep you the coolest?
    5. Which material do you think will keep you the warmest?

    Extension Questions:

    6. Which material would be best for summer? Which material would be best for winter?

    7. Which material would you wear in Alaska? Which material would you wear in Hawaii?

    8. Would the same materials in different colors give us the same results?



    This experiment is courtesy of 



    My Dog Kelly

    Follow Us On:
           

    Privacy Policy - Site Map - About Us - Letters to the Editor

    Comments and inquiries could be addressed to:
    webmaster@julianTrubin.com


    Last updated: June 2013
    Copyright 2003-2013 Julian Rubin